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Antigo man finds success in the lifetime sport of curling
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The sport of curling is an ever-popular pastime on many sheets of ice across North America, especially in the Midwest.

After receiving a boost from the United States' first-ever gold medal in the sport in the 2018 Winter Olympics, attendance at curling clubs throughout the nation has seen an upswing.

An individual not new to the sport is Antigo's own Harley Davison. The 68-year-old Davison, recently competed in the USSMCA National Senior Men's Curling Championships, hosted by Madison and Janesville Feb. 13-16.

Davison, who is approaching 60 years of curling experience, was part of Team Sirrianni, joining three others in the Super Senior Division for ages 63 and over. Davison's teammates on Team Sirrianni included Steve Sirrianni, Steve Wykle and Pat Meyer. All are members of the nearby Wausau Curling Club.

A total of 64 teams, divided into three age groups, were entered on a first-come, first-serve signup basis. In addition to the Super Senior Division, Seniors (55-63) and Masters (68 and over) competed.

Curling teams came from 11 states, as far away as California, Nevada and Arizona.

Despite some tough competition, Davison's Team Sirrianni made it all the way to the championship match, before falling to Team Haluptzok from Bemidji, Minn., adding a second place national medal to Davison's already impressive trophy cases.

His squad matched up with teams from four different states on the way to the runner-up finish.

“It was a very positive thing to do, we performed very well,” he said. “Curling really is a lifetime sport, and you can see it at things like this, not only with us but with the Masters Division.”

Young-at-heart players approaching 90-years-of-age in the Masters Division are common on the curling circuit, most don a helmet, knee and elbow pads however, as they approach their twilight years.

“It's for people of all athletic abilities,” Davison said. “Some are very talented, some not as much, I got into it as a family sport when I was 11 growing up in Portage.”

The Columbia County area has five curling clubs in a 25-mile radius.

Davison, the long-time principal at Marshfield High School, who retired in 2007 and moved to Antigo in 2012, has managed to continue what has been a long curling career.

“To be perfectly honest the event is a big deal in curling,” Davison said. “But I've curled in many spiels that were much more competitive and tougher, but with my age I don't slide any more and have to use a stick.”

Sliding refers to the person sending the rock or stone, which weighs in at a whopping 43 pounds down the ice, while those with “sticks”, which are most similar to a push broom, sweep the path to the target.

The average curling game lasts about two hours. Eight “ends” are played, which are similar to an inning of baseball. Teams of four take turns to curl two rocks towards the target area with the scores being counted after all 16 rocks have been sent down the ice.

The rock closest to the button wins that end and the winning team is then awarded one point for each of its rocks lying closer to the button than the opponent's closest rock.

Sweeping is done to limit the “curl” and help the stone go further.

Although knee issues put a stop to Davison's career as a slider, his performance as a sweeper has allowed him to continue curling, while elevating his game and that of his team.

Many curlers can travel the nation for a jam-packed schedule of events running from late November to mid-August. A quick glance at the backpages of United States Curling News magazine shows the list of events, from Alaska to New Jersey, back to Wisconsin with many points in between.

While a career in curling has produced two cases jam-packed with medals and trophies, Davison is certainly not done yet. Upcoming locations includes an event in Appleton this weekend, along with another on the docket in Green Bay, before Davison wraps up for the year.

“I started as a kid and there is no doubt curling kept me in college for another year because I played every weekend,” Davison added. “I can't say enough positive things about curling, it's a tough sport to watch, but the Olympians now, I played against their fathers and grandfathers, that's something special and it is truly a lifetime sport.”

More information on curling and the Wausau Curling Club can be found at wausaucurling.org. The club was founded in 1920 and is one of the nation's oldest, always welcoming new members and offering learn to curl programs.
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Antigo man finds success in the lifetime sport of curling
space
The sport of curling is an ever-popular pastime on many sheets of ice across North America, especially in the Midwest.

After receiving a boost from the United States' first-ever gold medal in the sport in the 2018 Winter Olympics, attendance at curling clubs throughout the nation has seen an upswing.

An individual not new to the sport is Antigo's own Harley Davison. The 68-year-old Davison, recently competed in the USSMCA National Senior Men's Curling Championships, hosted by Madison and Janesville Feb. 13-16.

Davison, who is approaching 60 years of curling experience, was part of Team Sirrianni, joining three others in the Super Senior Division for ages 63 and over. Davison's teammates on Team Sirrianni included Steve Sirrianni, Steve Wykle and Pat Meyer. All are members of the nearby Wausau Curling Club.

A total of 64 teams, divided into three age groups, were entered on a first-come, first-serve signup basis. In addition to the Super Senior Division, Seniors (55-63) and Masters (68 and over) competed.

Curling teams came from 11 states, as far away as California, Nevada and Arizona.

Despite some tough competition, Davison's Team Sirrianni made it all the way to the championship match, before falling to Team Haluptzok from Bemidji, Minn., adding a second place national medal to Davison's already impressive trophy cases.

His squad matched up with teams from four different states on the way to the runner-up finish.

“It was a very positive thing to do, we performed very well,” he said. “Curling really is a lifetime sport, and you can see it at things like this, not only with us but with the Masters Division.”

Young-at-heart players approaching 90-years-of-age in the Masters Division are common on the curling circuit, most don a helmet, knee and elbow pads however, as they approach their twilight years.

“It's for people of all athletic abilities,” Davison said. “Some are very talented, some not as much, I got into it as a family sport when I was 11 growing up in Portage.”

The Columbia County area has five curling clubs in a 25-mile radius.

Davison, the long-time principal at Marshfield High School, who retired in 2007 and moved to Antigo in 2012, has managed to continue what has been a long curling career.

“To be perfectly honest the event is a big deal in curling,” Davison said. “But I've curled in many spiels that were much more competitive and tougher, but with my age I don't slide any more and have to use a stick.”

Sliding refers to the person sending the rock or stone, which weighs in at a whopping 43 pounds down the ice, while those with “sticks”, which are most similar to a push broom, sweep the path to the target.

The average curling game lasts about two hours. Eight “ends” are played, which are similar to an inning of baseball. Teams of four take turns to curl two rocks towards the target area with the scores being counted after all 16 rocks have been sent down the ice.

The rock closest to the button wins that end and the winning team is then awarded one point for each of its rocks lying closer to the button than the opponent's closest rock.

Sweeping is done to limit the “curl” and help the stone go further.

Although knee issues put a stop to Davison's career as a slider, his performance as a sweeper has allowed him to continue curling, while elevating his game and that of his team.

Many curlers can travel the nation for a jam-packed schedule of events running from late November to mid-August. A quick glance at the backpages of United States Curling News magazine shows the list of events, from Alaska to New Jersey, back to Wisconsin with many points in between.

While a career in curling has produced two cases jam-packed with medals and trophies, Davison is certainly not done yet. Upcoming locations includes an event in Appleton this weekend, along with another on the docket in Green Bay, before Davison wraps up for the year.

“I started as a kid and there is no doubt curling kept me in college for another year because I played every weekend,” Davison added. “I can't say enough positive things about curling, it's a tough sport to watch, but the Olympians now, I played against their fathers and grandfathers, that's something special and it is truly a lifetime sport.”

More information on curling and the Wausau Curling Club can be found at wausaucurling.org. The club was founded in 1920 and is one of the nation's oldest, always welcoming new members and offering learn to curl programs.
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ANTIGO DAILY
JOURNAL
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Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
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Mail to: Fred Berner
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Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

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