Antigo Daily Journal
space
space Front Page Calendar & Events Classifieds News Obituaries Opinion/Letters Sports

Breaking News

We remember our editor and friend, he would be pleased
space
At 1:50 in the afternoon on Monday, Al  turned  42 levers on his meticulously maintained press and the big Goss started to roll.

Ka-chunk, ka-chunk, ka-chunk, sending out 182 copies a minute of the Antigo Daily Journal.

We were 10 minutes late. Fred would not be pleased.

Early that day, our publisher, editor, boss, and friend, Fred Berner, came to workway before dawn as was his customtook off his jacket and began what was scheduled to be his final week producing the newspaper to which he had devoted his life. He liked that quiet time of day, perusing the Associated Press wire, surrounded by the various accoutrements of the business. He was unhurried and unharried.

The day had a plan and there would be no reason to be late.

But daily newspapering is unlike any other business and no plan goes unpunished. At age 71, robust and looking forward to a long future, Fred passed away at his desk.

It was, as a journalist friend said, a horrible, yet fitting and even poetic end.

There is a reason for the stereotype of a hard-living, hard-driving newspaper editor think Jason Robards in “All the President's Men” it's a tough business. 

News is often unpleasant, whether it be a house fire that kills a family, a car accident that leaves a teen-ager maimed, or a political scandal that cheats the public and robs their pocketbooks. Court proceedings must be reported and that may involve friends and perhaps even family. The hours are atrocious.

But there are wonderful moments, too. The Christmas parades and chili cookouts, the youth fair, the ability to hobnob with game-changing leaders, and the opportunity to share the honor rolls, the anniversaries and the accomplishments. It's all part of the game.

And every day, the ka-chunk, ka-chunk of that big Goss.

Fred loved it all. He was a chronicler of the community. Hundreds, thousands of times, he penned the first line of the historical record, long before the rewrites.

He loved Antigo with an unrivaled yet quiet passion. He mourned its shortcomings and reveled in its successes.

As one person wrote in a tribute, “he made me proud of my hometown.”

He could be imposing, always in a good suit or sport coat and tie, and he could be self-effacing. A couple decades back he came across one of those” “you know you're from a small town”  ditties that talked about being a newspaper publisher. He reveled in the fact that he fit the bill perfectly, right down to always carrying a camera and running (if necessary) a paper route.

Above all, he could be brave, standing up for his family and his community. And one of the bravest things he did was realizing that in a changing business environment, the best way to ensure a successful, stable future for the Antigo Daily Journal was through an association with a larger organization. He researched carefully to find a good fit with his philosophy of community journalism, and signed the papers in June, transferring the newspaper to Adams Publishing Group.

It was time to turn the page, start the next chapter, pick whatever publishing  cliche you wish. It was time to revisit some old haunts and find some new. It was time to relax with his beloved Kay, play board games with friends, watch those old Sherlock Holmes and Thin Man movies that he could recite by heart, and read those books he never had time to finish.

At the same time he wanted to remain involved. He wanted to keep writing his Bits & Pieces and his 50 and 75-Years-Ago Peeps at Our Past. He wanted to be relied upon to run a paper route or two and certainly grab a camera and cover an event.

He was ready to retire. He wasn't ready to leave.

Our Antigo Daily Journal family feels Fred's loss deeply. And we have a responsibility to ourand Fred'slarger family that encompasses the Antigo, Langlade County and farther-afield communities we serve.

On Saturday, we will say good-bye to Fred. As someone noted earlier in the week, for the first time in the Journal's 115-year history, there will be no Berner in the building, at least not in a physical sense. But Fred's legacy, his knowledge, his love of the community and of us, permeates everything we do. He taught us well.

And when that big Goss starts ka-chunking in a few hours, we will be on time.

Fred would be pleased.

-30-
space

We remember our editor and friend, he would be pleased
space
At 1:50 in the afternoon on Monday, Al  turned  42 levers on his meticulously maintained press and the big Goss started to roll.

Ka-chunk, ka-chunk, ka-chunk, sending out 182 copies a minute of the Antigo Daily Journal.

We were 10 minutes late. Fred would not be pleased.

Early that day, our publisher, editor, boss, and friend, Fred Berner, came to workway before dawn as was his customtook off his jacket and began what was scheduled to be his final week producing the newspaper to which he had devoted his life. He liked that quiet time of day, perusing the Associated Press wire, surrounded by the various accoutrements of the business. He was unhurried and unharried.

The day had a plan and there would be no reason to be late.

But daily newspapering is unlike any other business and no plan goes unpunished. At age 71, robust and looking forward to a long future, Fred passed away at his desk.

It was, as a journalist friend said, a horrible, yet fitting and even poetic end.

There is a reason for the stereotype of a hard-living, hard-driving newspaper editor think Jason Robards in “All the President's Men” it's a tough business. 

News is often unpleasant, whether it be a house fire that kills a family, a car accident that leaves a teen-ager maimed, or a political scandal that cheats the public and robs their pocketbooks. Court proceedings must be reported and that may involve friends and perhaps even family. The hours are atrocious.

But there are wonderful moments, too. The Christmas parades and chili cookouts, the youth fair, the ability to hobnob with game-changing leaders, and the opportunity to share the honor rolls, the anniversaries and the accomplishments. It's all part of the game.

And every day, the ka-chunk, ka-chunk of that big Goss.

Fred loved it all. He was a chronicler of the community. Hundreds, thousands of times, he penned the first line of the historical record, long before the rewrites.

He loved Antigo with an unrivaled yet quiet passion. He mourned its shortcomings and reveled in its successes.

As one person wrote in a tribute, “he made me proud of my hometown.”

He could be imposing, always in a good suit or sport coat and tie, and he could be self-effacing. A couple decades back he came across one of those” “you know you're from a small town”  ditties that talked about being a newspaper publisher. He reveled in the fact that he fit the bill perfectly, right down to always carrying a camera and running (if necessary) a paper route.

Above all, he could be brave, standing up for his family and his community. And one of the bravest things he did was realizing that in a changing business environment, the best way to ensure a successful, stable future for the Antigo Daily Journal was through an association with a larger organization. He researched carefully to find a good fit with his philosophy of community journalism, and signed the papers in June, transferring the newspaper to Adams Publishing Group.

It was time to turn the page, start the next chapter, pick whatever publishing  cliche you wish. It was time to revisit some old haunts and find some new. It was time to relax with his beloved Kay, play board games with friends, watch those old Sherlock Holmes and Thin Man movies that he could recite by heart, and read those books he never had time to finish.

At the same time he wanted to remain involved. He wanted to keep writing his Bits & Pieces and his 50 and 75-Years-Ago Peeps at Our Past. He wanted to be relied upon to run a paper route or two and certainly grab a camera and cover an event.

He was ready to retire. He wasn't ready to leave.

Our Antigo Daily Journal family feels Fred's loss deeply. And we have a responsibility to ourand Fred'slarger family that encompasses the Antigo, Langlade County and farther-afield communities we serve.

On Saturday, we will say good-bye to Fred. As someone noted earlier in the week, for the first time in the Journal's 115-year history, there will be no Berner in the building, at least not in a physical sense. But Fred's legacy, his knowledge, his love of the community and of us, permeates everything we do. He taught us well.

And when that big Goss starts ka-chunking in a few hours, we will be on time.

Fred would be pleased.

-30-
space
2019
Wisconsin Public Notice Search
Wisconsin Public Notice Search

space
ANTIGO DAILY
JOURNAL
612 Superior Street
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

WEEKLY
JOURNAL
EXPRESS
612 Superior Street,
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

*Member WNA & NNA

space
Quick
News Search

Enter Key Word
space
space

Material on this web site has a
copyright by Antigo Daily Journal.
All rights reserved.
© 2000-2019
space