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Aspirus focuses on youth concussions
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It's football season and sports injuries are a common safety concern for school-age athletes.

Concussions, which affect tens of thousands of young athletes in the U.S. each year, are among the most serious. These brain injuries can be especially dangerous--even deadly--if a second concussion occurs before the first has enough time to heal.

Aspirus Langlade Hospital has been providing coverage at Antigo High School athletics for more than 25 years.  Sandi Robrecht, athletic trainer, attends more than 20 different sports throughout the school year including baseball, basketball, hockey, gymnastics and football. 

This past two football seasons, Dr. Cody Nikolai is an orthopedic surgeon and has been on the sidelines with her.  

“Parents can take the lead in reducing the risk of concussions by verifying that your child's school, league or district has a concussion policy,” Dr. Nikolai said. “Athletes who sustain a concussion may not realize it or may insist they're fine. So, it's important to watch for signs and symptoms that may mean a concussion.” 

Possible symptoms your child might report include headache, nausea or vomiting, balance or vision problems, Sensitivity to light or noise, dazed appearance, confusion or forgetfulness, clumsy movement, qlow response when asked questions, or change in mood, behavior or personality.

If you think your child might have a concussion, get medical help,” Robrecht said. “Doctors can evaluate your child and determine what the next steps should be.”

Robrecht and Nikolai stressed the importance of following the rules of the game and the coach's rules for safety. 

“Make sure your child wears appropriate protective equipment,” Nikolai said. “Helmets are a must for riding activities, such as cycling or skateboarding, or collision sports, such as football or ice hockey. They help reduce the risk of a serious brain injury or skull fracture. Be aware, however, that helmets are not designed to prevent concussions. That's why your child needs to avoid hits to the head as much as possible.”
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Sandi Robrecht, athletic trainer, and Dr. Cody Nikolai, an orthopedic surgeon, are focusing on identifying and treating concussions in high school athletes.

Aspirus focuses on youth concussions
space
It's football season and sports injuries are a common safety concern for school-age athletes.

Concussions, which affect tens of thousands of young athletes in the U.S. each year, are among the most serious. These brain injuries can be especially dangerous--even deadly--if a second concussion occurs before the first has enough time to heal.

Aspirus Langlade Hospital has been providing coverage at Antigo High School athletics for more than 25 years.  Sandi Robrecht, athletic trainer, attends more than 20 different sports throughout the school year including baseball, basketball, hockey, gymnastics and football. 

This past two football seasons, Dr. Cody Nikolai is an orthopedic surgeon and has been on the sidelines with her.  

“Parents can take the lead in reducing the risk of concussions by verifying that your child's school, league or district has a concussion policy,” Dr. Nikolai said. “Athletes who sustain a concussion may not realize it or may insist they're fine. So, it's important to watch for signs and symptoms that may mean a concussion.” 

Possible symptoms your child might report include headache, nausea or vomiting, balance or vision problems, Sensitivity to light or noise, dazed appearance, confusion or forgetfulness, clumsy movement, qlow response when asked questions, or change in mood, behavior or personality.

If you think your child might have a concussion, get medical help,” Robrecht said. “Doctors can evaluate your child and determine what the next steps should be.”

Robrecht and Nikolai stressed the importance of following the rules of the game and the coach's rules for safety. 

“Make sure your child wears appropriate protective equipment,” Nikolai said. “Helmets are a must for riding activities, such as cycling or skateboarding, or collision sports, such as football or ice hockey. They help reduce the risk of a serious brain injury or skull fracture. Be aware, however, that helmets are not designed to prevent concussions. That's why your child needs to avoid hits to the head as much as possible.”
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Sandi Robrecht, athletic trainer, and Dr. Cody Nikolai, an orthopedic surgeon, are focusing on identifying and treating concussions in high school athletes.
2019
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ANTIGO DAILY
JOURNAL
612 Superior Street
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

WEEKLY
JOURNAL
EXPRESS
612 Superior Street,
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

*Member WNA & NNA

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