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State governor's race is real nail-biter, Antigo has an independent candidate
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Antigo has an especially personal stake in the race for Wisconsin governor on Tuesday.

Dr. Maggie Turnbull, who calls this her home, is running as an independent candidate Tuesday, admittedly overshadowed by the neck and neck battle between Gov. Scott Walker, a Republican, and Democratic challenger Tony Evers, the state superintendent of public instruction.

Although she now lives in Madison, Turnbull often returns to the northwoods, and plans an election partyâ€regardless of outcomeâ€on Tuesday in Antigo.

She and her friends and supporters plan to make the rounds of local night spots and watch results from Fifth Avenue Restaurant and Lounge starting at about 6 p.m.

Her yard signs have been sprouting around Antigo and across her northwoods base and she said she hopes to “flip Langlade County.”

“Let's make our mark on that Wisconsin map,” she said.

An astrobiologist, Turnbull is running on a slogan of “Let Wisconsin Shine” and is stressing her strong independent credentials.

“I want to offer voters an independent option on the ballot this year as an alternative to the two party system driven by money and outside interests,” Turnbull said. “I'll do whatever it takes to restore balance and sanity to our highest office.”

While she made her home base in Antigo, she helped develop the farm market and spearheaded a project tapping municipal maple trees. She also served as Ninth Ward alderman from 2009 to 2013.  She now manages a large nationwide team of scientists to design and build spacecraft as part of NASA's mission to search for planets and life beyond our Solar System.

Turnbull is certainly gaining name recognition, but the two top tier candidates remain Walker, running for a third term. and Evers, who became the Democratic nominee after the August 14 primar.

Chair of the Wisconsin Libertarian Party Phil Anderson will also be challenging the election, running on the Libertarian ticket.

According to the latest poll, Walker trails Evers by 5 points just days before the midterm election.

The survey from Emerson College released Friday shows Evers with 51 percent support among likely voters, compared to Walker's 46 percent. Only 1 percent of respondents were undecided.

About 45 percent of likely voters surveyed have favorable views of Walker, who's been endorsed by President Trump, while 50 percent have an unfavorable view of him.

Former President Obama endorsed Evers earlier this month and this week appeared at campaign rallies for him..

The poll surveyed 604 likely voters mostly by phone from Oct. 29-31 and had a margin of error of plus or minus 4.1 percentage points.

The non-partisan Cook Political Report rates the race as a “toss up.”

WPR's Beyond the Ballot project recently asked about something the government has done to help them and several people recalled a check they received this summer when Walker's administration turned a revenue surplus into a $100-per-child tax refund.

"Gov. Walker just signed that $100 tax credit per child,"Amber Hatcher-Dezeeuw, who lives in Onalaska, outside La Crosse, said. "It's something small, but for so many families, especially in our community, that $100 is the difference between making it that one time."

"I did get $100 in tax rebate for having a child this year," Brian Kowalkowski from Shawano said..

Steve Lord Sr. of West Bend in southeastern Wisconsin is a Walker supporter. When it comes to something the government has done that was helpful for him, he thought of reductions to his own tax bill.

"I especially like what he's done with the taxes and lower property taxes," he said.

One of Evers' latest platform announcements was a promise to cut state income taxes for middle class families by 10 percent. He'd do it by redirecting the funds for one of Walker's signature measures â€Â a tax cut for farmers and manufacturers.

On the campaign trail, Walker warns that Evers' tax cut will result in increases elsewhere and that the state's gas tax would increase under the Democrat.

But tax cuts may no longer be the reliable winner they have been in recent decades.

Brookings Institution fellow Vanessa Williamson has looked at why Republicans nationally backed off of talking about the federal tax cuts passed last December as midterm campaigns ramped up.

"What's been interesting is to see people being willing to take into consideration the possibility that you could raise and just use the money for a good purpose, often things like schools and health care are very popular," she said, referring to national voter polls.

In Wisconsin, the latest Marquette University Law School poll found 57 percent of voters favored increasing school spending over cutting taxes. Only 37 percent preferred a tax cut.

Some Wisconsinites did tell WPR reporters that lowering taxes and keeping them low is one of the most important issues for them this election season. Others fell into the camp that may no longer be strongly motivated by the promise of a tax cut.

Hatcher-Dezeeuw said she's looking for something else from candidates in this election.

"Whoever is going to protect my kids in schools and whoever is going to do what's best for them," she said. "Get our teachers the funding they need, get our teachers what they need to teach out kids. That's (the) most important thing to me."

And Kowalkowski saw that summertime check as a political ploy.

"It had little impact on me," he said, "but I think about the money that could have been spent in other ways in the state that would have been a lot more beneficial whether for roads or programs for youth or education."

Funding for roads and schools has also played prominently in the lead up to next week's election when voters will either reward Walker's track record on taxes and spending or look for a new direction from Evers.

Turnbull said the independent truth, minus the party static, is that the state's economy should be strengthened from within, by investing in Wisconsin-owned businesses and revitalizing smaller communities that have room to grow through tax incentives, grants to build supportive infrastructure and beautification projects to create livable communities.

The economy must also be diverse, she stressed, in order to withstand changes to the wider market.

“That doesn't mean we can't work with outside investors, including offering tax incentives,” she said. “But the laws we have in place to protect our natural resources have to be taken seriously. We need healthy ecological systems in order to survive and enjoy our lives here, long after any one company arrives or leaves.”
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From left, Scott Walker, Tony Evers and Dr. Maggie Turnbull, candidates for governor.

State governor's race is real nail-biter, Antigo has an independent candidate
space
Antigo has an especially personal stake in the race for Wisconsin governor on Tuesday.

Dr. Maggie Turnbull, who calls this her home, is running as an independent candidate Tuesday, admittedly overshadowed by the neck and neck battle between Gov. Scott Walker, a Republican, and Democratic challenger Tony Evers, the state superintendent of public instruction.

Although she now lives in Madison, Turnbull often returns to the northwoods, and plans an election partyâ€regardless of outcomeâ€on Tuesday in Antigo.

She and her friends and supporters plan to make the rounds of local night spots and watch results from Fifth Avenue Restaurant and Lounge starting at about 6 p.m.

Her yard signs have been sprouting around Antigo and across her northwoods base and she said she hopes to “flip Langlade County.”

“Let's make our mark on that Wisconsin map,” she said.

An astrobiologist, Turnbull is running on a slogan of “Let Wisconsin Shine” and is stressing her strong independent credentials.

“I want to offer voters an independent option on the ballot this year as an alternative to the two party system driven by money and outside interests,” Turnbull said. “I'll do whatever it takes to restore balance and sanity to our highest office.”

While she made her home base in Antigo, she helped develop the farm market and spearheaded a project tapping municipal maple trees. She also served as Ninth Ward alderman from 2009 to 2013.  She now manages a large nationwide team of scientists to design and build spacecraft as part of NASA's mission to search for planets and life beyond our Solar System.

Turnbull is certainly gaining name recognition, but the two top tier candidates remain Walker, running for a third term. and Evers, who became the Democratic nominee after the August 14 primar.

Chair of the Wisconsin Libertarian Party Phil Anderson will also be challenging the election, running on the Libertarian ticket.

According to the latest poll, Walker trails Evers by 5 points just days before the midterm election.

The survey from Emerson College released Friday shows Evers with 51 percent support among likely voters, compared to Walker's 46 percent. Only 1 percent of respondents were undecided.

About 45 percent of likely voters surveyed have favorable views of Walker, who's been endorsed by President Trump, while 50 percent have an unfavorable view of him.

Former President Obama endorsed Evers earlier this month and this week appeared at campaign rallies for him..

The poll surveyed 604 likely voters mostly by phone from Oct. 29-31 and had a margin of error of plus or minus 4.1 percentage points.

The non-partisan Cook Political Report rates the race as a “toss up.”

WPR's Beyond the Ballot project recently asked about something the government has done to help them and several people recalled a check they received this summer when Walker's administration turned a revenue surplus into a $100-per-child tax refund.

"Gov. Walker just signed that $100 tax credit per child,"Amber Hatcher-Dezeeuw, who lives in Onalaska, outside La Crosse, said. "It's something small, but for so many families, especially in our community, that $100 is the difference between making it that one time."

"I did get $100 in tax rebate for having a child this year," Brian Kowalkowski from Shawano said..

Steve Lord Sr. of West Bend in southeastern Wisconsin is a Walker supporter. When it comes to something the government has done that was helpful for him, he thought of reductions to his own tax bill.

"I especially like what he's done with the taxes and lower property taxes," he said.

One of Evers' latest platform announcements was a promise to cut state income taxes for middle class families by 10 percent. He'd do it by redirecting the funds for one of Walker's signature measures â€Â a tax cut for farmers and manufacturers.

On the campaign trail, Walker warns that Evers' tax cut will result in increases elsewhere and that the state's gas tax would increase under the Democrat.

But tax cuts may no longer be the reliable winner they have been in recent decades.

Brookings Institution fellow Vanessa Williamson has looked at why Republicans nationally backed off of talking about the federal tax cuts passed last December as midterm campaigns ramped up.

"What's been interesting is to see people being willing to take into consideration the possibility that you could raise and just use the money for a good purpose, often things like schools and health care are very popular," she said, referring to national voter polls.

In Wisconsin, the latest Marquette University Law School poll found 57 percent of voters favored increasing school spending over cutting taxes. Only 37 percent preferred a tax cut.

Some Wisconsinites did tell WPR reporters that lowering taxes and keeping them low is one of the most important issues for them this election season. Others fell into the camp that may no longer be strongly motivated by the promise of a tax cut.

Hatcher-Dezeeuw said she's looking for something else from candidates in this election.

"Whoever is going to protect my kids in schools and whoever is going to do what's best for them," she said. "Get our teachers the funding they need, get our teachers what they need to teach out kids. That's (the) most important thing to me."

And Kowalkowski saw that summertime check as a political ploy.

"It had little impact on me," he said, "but I think about the money that could have been spent in other ways in the state that would have been a lot more beneficial whether for roads or programs for youth or education."

Funding for roads and schools has also played prominently in the lead up to next week's election when voters will either reward Walker's track record on taxes and spending or look for a new direction from Evers.

Turnbull said the independent truth, minus the party static, is that the state's economy should be strengthened from within, by investing in Wisconsin-owned businesses and revitalizing smaller communities that have room to grow through tax incentives, grants to build supportive infrastructure and beautification projects to create livable communities.

The economy must also be diverse, she stressed, in order to withstand changes to the wider market.

“That doesn't mean we can't work with outside investors, including offering tax incentives,” she said. “But the laws we have in place to protect our natural resources have to be taken seriously. We need healthy ecological systems in order to survive and enjoy our lives here, long after any one company arrives or leaves.”
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From left, Scott Walker, Tony Evers and Dr. Maggie Turnbull, candidates for governor.
2018
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Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

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