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Early Post Lake history was the primary feature at a 1930 picnic
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Editor’s Note: The following article was printed in the Antigo Daily Journal prior to a June 15, 1930 meeting of the Langlade County Historical Society, where the history of Post Lake was discussed.

While it does not state that the picnic was to be held at Post Lake, that was the likely site.

The article offers a glimpse into Historical Society programs 88 years ago and at the same time, a history of the early Post Lake area. There was a good chance some of the pioneers mentioned in this article were on hand and spoke at the picnic.

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Attendance at the second annual picnic and old settler’s day of the Langlade County Historical Society at Post Lake, Sunday, June 15, is expected to far surpass that at the picnic of last year. The society has invited all who are invited in their program and purposes to attend. All the communities have completed their arrangements, and word was received this morning from Charles E. Brown, selected for the principle speaker, that we would start for Antigo late today or tomorrow morning.

Mr. Brown is chief of the site museum at Madison, out of the largest and best in the country. He will speak on Indian Myths and Legends, and also touch on the subject of Indian mounds and what they reveal.

The Antigo Eagles band of 23 pieces has been engaged to play at the picnic. Asa Fowler, harmonica, and P.T. Gillett, violin, will offer some old-time selections. Dan Grand is expected to sing some of the ballads of the woodsmen and rivermen of days gone by.

There will be plenty of amusements for those desiring exercise; horseshoes, kittenball, races, boating and bathing.

The society will have a tent for the sale of ice cream, pop, etc., but there will be no lunches sold as this is to be a basket picnic.

Theodore T. Brown, chief of the Neville museum, and J.P. Schumacker, Green Bay, both much interested in the Post Lake mounds, and Arthur P. Kannenberg of the Oshkosh museum are among the prominent outsiders expected to attend and contribute to the program.

Judge J. W. Parsons, president of the Langlade County Historical Society will preside.

Historical Background

Post Lake, according to an old tradition, was the birthplace of Queen Marinette, one of the most picturesque figures in early Wisconsin history, and after whom a city and a county were named. Her father was Bartelemi Chevallier, a French trader from Mackinac, and her mother was the daughter of an Indian chief, Wau-ba-shish, meaning the marten.’’ Whether she was Menominee, or part Menominee and part Chippewa, seems to be in doubt.

In support of the theory that Marinette was born at her father’s trading establishment at Post Lake, or some other point distant from Mackinac, the Mackinac church record of baptisms is cited, July 22, 1786, I the undersigned priest, baptized Marquerits, two years, four months and six days old, daughter of Bartelemi Chevallier and of a savage mother. The godfather was Monsieur Jean Baptiste Chevallier, and the godmother Madame Bourass, who declares that she could not sign her name, as did her father.

Signed: J. Baptiste Chevallier,

Payet: Miss. Priest.’’

John V. Satterlee, a prominent Menominee Indian, still living says that he knew Marinette quite well, for her son John B. Jacobs junior was Satterlee’s godfather and stood sponsor at his baptism.

Queen Marinette died at the home of her son, George Farnsworth in Green Bay in 1865.

The Mackinac Register, according to the Green Bay Historical Bulletin’’ gives the name Marquerite Chevallier, daughter of Bartelemi Chevallier, but later this was changed to Marinette,’’ and given to the little girl as the diminutive of Marie Antoinette, in memory at the unhappy queen whose tragic life and death was much in the minds of the French Canadians of that day. So Marquerite grew into Queen Marinette.’’

Part of a silver tea set used in Marinette’s home is now the property of Mrs. John F. Martin of Green Bay, a granddaughter.

John P. Schumacher, archeologist of Green Bay, says that it is an established fact that there was a large Indian village in the vicinity of Post Lake in the latter part of the eighteenth century. Abundant corroborative evidence is found in the numerous Indian mounds which once existed at Post Lake, and which are now mostly obliterated. Earl Weed says that there were nine in the near vicinity of the picnic grounds, and he has recovered great numbers of Indian arrows, axes, bones, and skulls from them.

That the Indian village was in close contact with white traders is shown by the fact that on the Maney farm west of the lake numbers of glass beads have been turned up at nearly every plowing of one of the fields.

Another curious relic is a bronze ring in the possession Harry Graves of this city, and which was found on the bench of Post Lake many years ago. It bears the initials IHS, and the Rev. Francis J. Betten of Marquette university says it undoubted dates back to the period of the Jesuit missions.

Mrs. Louis Kawalski of this city says that certain records of her family, now lost or destroyed, referred to a trading establishment on Post Lake. She has not seen them since she was a young woman, but is positive on this point.
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This is a photograph from Robert Dessureau’s History of Langlade County, published in 1922. The picture was not taken at Post Lake, but at Otter Lake in the town of Elcho.

Early Post Lake history was the primary feature at a 1930 picnic
space
Editor’s Note: The following article was printed in the Antigo Daily Journal prior to a June 15, 1930 meeting of the Langlade County Historical Society, where the history of Post Lake was discussed.

While it does not state that the picnic was to be held at Post Lake, that was the likely site.

The article offers a glimpse into Historical Society programs 88 years ago and at the same time, a history of the early Post Lake area. There was a good chance some of the pioneers mentioned in this article were on hand and spoke at the picnic.

覧覧覧



Attendance at the second annual picnic and old settler’s day of the Langlade County Historical Society at Post Lake, Sunday, June 15, is expected to far surpass that at the picnic of last year. The society has invited all who are invited in their program and purposes to attend. All the communities have completed their arrangements, and word was received this morning from Charles E. Brown, selected for the principle speaker, that we would start for Antigo late today or tomorrow morning.

Mr. Brown is chief of the site museum at Madison, out of the largest and best in the country. He will speak on Indian Myths and Legends, and also touch on the subject of Indian mounds and what they reveal.

The Antigo Eagles band of 23 pieces has been engaged to play at the picnic. Asa Fowler, harmonica, and P.T. Gillett, violin, will offer some old-time selections. Dan Grand is expected to sing some of the ballads of the woodsmen and rivermen of days gone by.

There will be plenty of amusements for those desiring exercise; horseshoes, kittenball, races, boating and bathing.

The society will have a tent for the sale of ice cream, pop, etc., but there will be no lunches sold as this is to be a basket picnic.

Theodore T. Brown, chief of the Neville museum, and J.P. Schumacker, Green Bay, both much interested in the Post Lake mounds, and Arthur P. Kannenberg of the Oshkosh museum are among the prominent outsiders expected to attend and contribute to the program.

Judge J. W. Parsons, president of the Langlade County Historical Society will preside.

Historical Background

Post Lake, according to an old tradition, was the birthplace of Queen Marinette, one of the most picturesque figures in early Wisconsin history, and after whom a city and a county were named. Her father was Bartelemi Chevallier, a French trader from Mackinac, and her mother was the daughter of an Indian chief, Wau-ba-shish, meaning the marten.’’ Whether she was Menominee, or part Menominee and part Chippewa, seems to be in doubt.

In support of the theory that Marinette was born at her father’s trading establishment at Post Lake, or some other point distant from Mackinac, the Mackinac church record of baptisms is cited, July 22, 1786, I the undersigned priest, baptized Marquerits, two years, four months and six days old, daughter of Bartelemi Chevallier and of a savage mother. The godfather was Monsieur Jean Baptiste Chevallier, and the godmother Madame Bourass, who declares that she could not sign her name, as did her father.

Signed: J. Baptiste Chevallier,

Payet: Miss. Priest.’’

John V. Satterlee, a prominent Menominee Indian, still living says that he knew Marinette quite well, for her son John B. Jacobs junior was Satterlee’s godfather and stood sponsor at his baptism.

Queen Marinette died at the home of her son, George Farnsworth in Green Bay in 1865.

The Mackinac Register, according to the Green Bay Historical Bulletin’’ gives the name Marquerite Chevallier, daughter of Bartelemi Chevallier, but later this was changed to Marinette,’’ and given to the little girl as the diminutive of Marie Antoinette, in memory at the unhappy queen whose tragic life and death was much in the minds of the French Canadians of that day. So Marquerite grew into Queen Marinette.’’

Part of a silver tea set used in Marinette’s home is now the property of Mrs. John F. Martin of Green Bay, a granddaughter.

John P. Schumacher, archeologist of Green Bay, says that it is an established fact that there was a large Indian village in the vicinity of Post Lake in the latter part of the eighteenth century. Abundant corroborative evidence is found in the numerous Indian mounds which once existed at Post Lake, and which are now mostly obliterated. Earl Weed says that there were nine in the near vicinity of the picnic grounds, and he has recovered great numbers of Indian arrows, axes, bones, and skulls from them.

That the Indian village was in close contact with white traders is shown by the fact that on the Maney farm west of the lake numbers of glass beads have been turned up at nearly every plowing of one of the fields.

Another curious relic is a bronze ring in the possession Harry Graves of this city, and which was found on the bench of Post Lake many years ago. It bears the initials IHS, and the Rev. Francis J. Betten of Marquette university says it undoubted dates back to the period of the Jesuit missions.

Mrs. Louis Kawalski of this city says that certain records of her family, now lost or destroyed, referred to a trading establishment on Post Lake. She has not seen them since she was a young woman, but is positive on this point.
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This is a photograph from Robert Dessureau’s History of Langlade County, published in 1922. The picture was not taken at Post Lake, but at Otter Lake in the town of Elcho.
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ANTIGO DAILY
JOURNAL
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Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
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JOURNAL
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Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

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