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Antigo council backs trail system
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An expansive expansion of the city’s trail system, used by thousands of walkers, runners, cyclists and others throughout the year, was advanced by the Antigo Common Council Wednesday.

At a quick January meeting, aldermen authorized city officials to submit the paperwork for a state grant to expand the city’s existing bicycle/pedestrian trail system from north of the elevated boardwark across town to the Remington Lake on the city’s northwest side.

The city is seeking upwards of $750,000 for the expansion through the Department of Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP), a combination of three former funding programs know as Safe Routes to Schools, Transportation Enhancements and the Bicycles & Pedestrians Facilities Program.

The city has already applied for state Knowles Stewardship Funds to extend the trail from the north end of the elevated boardwalk along the east side of the Langlade County Fairgrounds to North Avenue. That project carries a $360,000 price tag and is anticipated for construction next year.

The new application is for additional funding through the state, with 2020 construction anticipated. Specific sections include:

—East side of Charlotte Street, North Avenue to Highway 64, $200,000.

—Charlotte Street widening, Highway 64 to Prosser Place, $100,000.

—Prosser Place and Charlotte Street to Amron Avenue, $135,000, or $155,0000 for a slightly longer alternate route.

—Amron Avenue and Saratoga Street, from Highway 45 to Bridge Street, $100,000.

—and from Bridge Street, past the dog park, to Remington Pond, $402,500.

The $750,000 grant would cover 80 percent of the anticipated cost approaching $1 million. Matching funds could come through urban forestry sales, Knowles Stewardship Grant, Inland Lake District as appropriate and through the city budget process.

The expansion would serve a variety of purposes, including connecting northern and planned western residential areas to the existing trail system, northside retail hub, and downtown.

Embraced by the community, the trail has been constructed and regularly expanded over the past decade, largely through grant funds with some city infusions of cash.

In other business, aldermen inked a resolution to have MSA Professional Services complete a preliminary survey relative to the demolition of the former Java Junction, 814 Fifth Ave.

Over the years, the structure has housed a variety of retail outlets, including a shoe store and a dress shop, and the second level once featured a dance hall complete with skylight, which is still in place. But it has fallen on rough times.

The city gained possession of the building through the tax reversion process. Efforts by staff to encourage potential developers and entrepreneurs to re-purpose it have been unsuccessful, primarily due to its condition.

It would be a tricky demolition, since the structure is sandwiched between other downtown retail structures that remain in use, MSA has agreed to perform the initial study at a cost of $8,500. The actual cost of razing will likely be far higher.

The city also took steps to demolish a deteriorating home at 702 South Clermont St., which has been deemed unfit for habitation by the building inspector.

Kautza Excavation LLC presented the bid deemed most advantageous for the work, at $8,490 not including removal of the foundation.

In other business, aldermen:

—established a volunteer chaplain program for the Police Department, with the resolution noting it would provide spiritual and emotional support to all members of the department, their families and members of the public.

—combine wards for the Feb. 20 spring primary election, which is expected to draw a very light turnout.

—reshuffled some capital improvement program funds, with no budget increase, to allow sooner-than anticipated replacement of a new pick-up truck, utility vehicle and three mowers for the park and recreation department. The money had originally been earmarked for a truck with dumpbox and a compact tractor with attachments.

—and approved a secondhand article dealer and secondhand jewelry license at 717-719 Fifth Ave. for Bevy LLC, Pamela Castaneda and Rebecca Stimac, partners.
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The color coded map, provided by city officials, shows the proposed route of the trail expansion, which would be funded largely through state grants.

Antigo council backs trail system
space
An expansive expansion of the city’s trail system, used by thousands of walkers, runners, cyclists and others throughout the year, was advanced by the Antigo Common Council Wednesday.

At a quick January meeting, aldermen authorized city officials to submit the paperwork for a state grant to expand the city’s existing bicycle/pedestrian trail system from north of the elevated boardwark across town to the Remington Lake on the city’s northwest side.

The city is seeking upwards of $750,000 for the expansion through the Department of Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP), a combination of three former funding programs know as Safe Routes to Schools, Transportation Enhancements and the Bicycles & Pedestrians Facilities Program.

The city has already applied for state Knowles Stewardship Funds to extend the trail from the north end of the elevated boardwalk along the east side of the Langlade County Fairgrounds to North Avenue. That project carries a $360,000 price tag and is anticipated for construction next year.

The new application is for additional funding through the state, with 2020 construction anticipated. Specific sections include:

—East side of Charlotte Street, North Avenue to Highway 64, $200,000.

—Charlotte Street widening, Highway 64 to Prosser Place, $100,000.

—Prosser Place and Charlotte Street to Amron Avenue, $135,000, or $155,0000 for a slightly longer alternate route.

—Amron Avenue and Saratoga Street, from Highway 45 to Bridge Street, $100,000.

—and from Bridge Street, past the dog park, to Remington Pond, $402,500.

The $750,000 grant would cover 80 percent of the anticipated cost approaching $1 million. Matching funds could come through urban forestry sales, Knowles Stewardship Grant, Inland Lake District as appropriate and through the city budget process.

The expansion would serve a variety of purposes, including connecting northern and planned western residential areas to the existing trail system, northside retail hub, and downtown.

Embraced by the community, the trail has been constructed and regularly expanded over the past decade, largely through grant funds with some city infusions of cash.

In other business, aldermen inked a resolution to have MSA Professional Services complete a preliminary survey relative to the demolition of the former Java Junction, 814 Fifth Ave.

Over the years, the structure has housed a variety of retail outlets, including a shoe store and a dress shop, and the second level once featured a dance hall complete with skylight, which is still in place. But it has fallen on rough times.

The city gained possession of the building through the tax reversion process. Efforts by staff to encourage potential developers and entrepreneurs to re-purpose it have been unsuccessful, primarily due to its condition.

It would be a tricky demolition, since the structure is sandwiched between other downtown retail structures that remain in use, MSA has agreed to perform the initial study at a cost of $8,500. The actual cost of razing will likely be far higher.

The city also took steps to demolish a deteriorating home at 702 South Clermont St., which has been deemed unfit for habitation by the building inspector.

Kautza Excavation LLC presented the bid deemed most advantageous for the work, at $8,490 not including removal of the foundation.

In other business, aldermen:

—established a volunteer chaplain program for the Police Department, with the resolution noting it would provide spiritual and emotional support to all members of the department, their families and members of the public.

—combine wards for the Feb. 20 spring primary election, which is expected to draw a very light turnout.

—reshuffled some capital improvement program funds, with no budget increase, to allow sooner-than anticipated replacement of a new pick-up truck, utility vehicle and three mowers for the park and recreation department. The money had originally been earmarked for a truck with dumpbox and a compact tractor with attachments.

—and approved a secondhand article dealer and secondhand jewelry license at 717-719 Fifth Ave. for Bevy LLC, Pamela Castaneda and Rebecca Stimac, partners.
space

The color coded map, provided by city officials, shows the proposed route of the trail expansion, which would be funded largely through state grants.
2018
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ANTIGO DAILY
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Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
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Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

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