Antigo Daily Journal
space
space Front Page Calendar & Events Classifieds News Obituaries Opinion/Letters Sports

Breaking News

State has sharp decline in farm numbers
space
While the number of dairy farms in Wisconsin is shrinking as small operations struggle to remain profitable, expanding commercial farms have continued to increase the state’s milk production.

Numbers from the state Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection show the state lost 500 dairy farms last year, Wisconsin Public Radio reported . Wisconsin’s dairy numbers have fallen more than 20 percent over the last five years. Just over 8,800 dairy herds were licensed in the state at the beginning of this year.

The growth is really in the medium- to large-size dairy operations, said Steven Deller, a professor of agricultural and applied economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The growth in those sectors and the increase in productivity of being a bigger operation, the volume of milk is actually not being affected by this.

Dan Marzu, the University of Wisconsin Extension agriculture educator for Lincoln and Langlade counties, explained today the number of cows has stayed fairly static in the last several years, but following trends, the number of herds dropped.

In 2016 there were 7,500 dairy cattle in Langlade County, a drop of only 100 down from the two previous years, but the herds had gone down to 42 from 52 in 2015.

Marzu said those numbers come from the USDA National Agriculture Statistics Service.

The Associated Press reported this week it’s difficult for small-scale dairy farms to be profitable, so the number of commercial farms will probably continue to decrease.

Farms that aren’t profitable don’t contribute to the local economy, Deller said.

Do you want to have 10 small farms that are producing poverty level jobs or income levels, or do you want to have one big farm that pays decent wages? From the point of view from the local economy, you want that one bigger operation, Deller said.

But fewer farms could hurt rural communities, said Kevin Bernhardt, a UW-Platteville agribusiness professor.

Less farms, less number of kids going to schools, less number of people who are buying inputs and so forth, less number of people to serve on school boards and church councils, etc., Bernhardt said. Less farms out there is not necessarily all negative, but it certainly has impacts on the rural community.

Small producers can tap into the growing interest in local food and specialty crops instead, Deller said.
space

A magazine took this picture of part of the Matsche farm during the fall of 2017. It does not show nearby dairy facilities and was taken before the site was landscaped.

State has sharp decline in farm numbers
space
While the number of dairy farms in Wisconsin is shrinking as small operations struggle to remain profitable, expanding commercial farms have continued to increase the state’s milk production.

Numbers from the state Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection show the state lost 500 dairy farms last year, Wisconsin Public Radio reported . Wisconsin’s dairy numbers have fallen more than 20 percent over the last five years. Just over 8,800 dairy herds were licensed in the state at the beginning of this year.

The growth is really in the medium- to large-size dairy operations, said Steven Deller, a professor of agricultural and applied economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The growth in those sectors and the increase in productivity of being a bigger operation, the volume of milk is actually not being affected by this.

Dan Marzu, the University of Wisconsin Extension agriculture educator for Lincoln and Langlade counties, explained today the number of cows has stayed fairly static in the last several years, but following trends, the number of herds dropped.

In 2016 there were 7,500 dairy cattle in Langlade County, a drop of only 100 down from the two previous years, but the herds had gone down to 42 from 52 in 2015.

Marzu said those numbers come from the USDA National Agriculture Statistics Service.

The Associated Press reported this week it’s difficult for small-scale dairy farms to be profitable, so the number of commercial farms will probably continue to decrease.

Farms that aren’t profitable don’t contribute to the local economy, Deller said.

Do you want to have 10 small farms that are producing poverty level jobs or income levels, or do you want to have one big farm that pays decent wages? From the point of view from the local economy, you want that one bigger operation, Deller said.

But fewer farms could hurt rural communities, said Kevin Bernhardt, a UW-Platteville agribusiness professor.

Less farms, less number of kids going to schools, less number of people who are buying inputs and so forth, less number of people to serve on school boards and church councils, etc., Bernhardt said. Less farms out there is not necessarily all negative, but it certainly has impacts on the rural community.

Small producers can tap into the growing interest in local food and specialty crops instead, Deller said.
space

A magazine took this picture of part of the Matsche farm during the fall of 2017. It does not show nearby dairy facilities and was taken before the site was landscaped.
2018
Wisconsin Public Notice Search
Wisconsin Public Notice Search

space
ANTIGO DAILY
JOURNAL
612 Superior Street
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

WEEKLY
JOURNAL
EXPRESS
612 Superior Street,
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

*Member WNA & NNA

space
Quick
News Search

Enter Key Word
space
space

Material on this web site has a
copyright by Antigo Daily Journal.
All rights reserved.
© 2000-2018
space