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City of Antigo works to curb water pipe freeze-up problems
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Two years after brutally cold conditions popped winter lines across the community, the city of Antigo is taking a proactive approach to potential winter freeze-ups.

We’re making the best decisions we can, Director of Administrative Services Mark Desotell said at a Thursday planning meeting with various department heads. We balance a number of factors and each decision creates other decisions.

The brutal subzero conditions of the past two weeks drove the frost in the roadways past the four foot mark while undisturbed surfaces covered by snow and ice probably have frost depths of 2 1/2 to 3 feet.

Water mains are typically six to seven feet below the surface, according to city project manager Charlie Brinkmeier, but a few freeze-ups has been reported on private service lines, which may be more shallow, that run between the street and homes.

City crews will thaw those lines, but under Public Service Commission orders, must invoice the owner for the work.

In another effort to pre-empt any problems, the city will also begin direct-feeding water from the wells on the southeast side of the community into the mains on Monday. Water directly from the wells is always a few degree warmer than the liquid stored in the city’s towers, another way to ease concerns about freezing.

The water will still be treated with chlorine and fluoride but will not be softened, so some discoloration may be present

Bob Piskula, the city’s street commissioner, said that crews are monitoring water temperatures at the city hydrants, with an extra-careful eye on areas of traditional freeze-ups, such as dead end lines that don’t have sustained flow. Water temperatures have been running at about 43 degrees, dipping to between 28 and 42 degrees in problem areas.

Unlike some communities, Antigo will not be likely to issue a citywide run order, which would allow residents to keep their faucets open a trickle. Tommy Horswill, project manager for Infrastructure Alternates, which operates the city’s water and wastewater plants, said there are several reasons, including unnecessary stress on both the wells and treatment plant.

We don’t want to overtax the plants, Desotell added.

Run orders could be issued, if needed, for specific neighborhoods or individual homes or businesses but plenty of notification will be given first.
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A city crew checked water temperatures and prepared to flush a hydrant at Eighth Avenue and Dorr Street this morning, another chilly day.

City of Antigo works to curb water pipe freeze-up problems
space
Two years after brutally cold conditions popped winter lines across the community, the city of Antigo is taking a proactive approach to potential winter freeze-ups.

We’re making the best decisions we can, Director of Administrative Services Mark Desotell said at a Thursday planning meeting with various department heads. We balance a number of factors and each decision creates other decisions.

The brutal subzero conditions of the past two weeks drove the frost in the roadways past the four foot mark while undisturbed surfaces covered by snow and ice probably have frost depths of 2 1/2 to 3 feet.

Water mains are typically six to seven feet below the surface, according to city project manager Charlie Brinkmeier, but a few freeze-ups has been reported on private service lines, which may be more shallow, that run between the street and homes.

City crews will thaw those lines, but under Public Service Commission orders, must invoice the owner for the work.

In another effort to pre-empt any problems, the city will also begin direct-feeding water from the wells on the southeast side of the community into the mains on Monday. Water directly from the wells is always a few degree warmer than the liquid stored in the city’s towers, another way to ease concerns about freezing.

The water will still be treated with chlorine and fluoride but will not be softened, so some discoloration may be present

Bob Piskula, the city’s street commissioner, said that crews are monitoring water temperatures at the city hydrants, with an extra-careful eye on areas of traditional freeze-ups, such as dead end lines that don’t have sustained flow. Water temperatures have been running at about 43 degrees, dipping to between 28 and 42 degrees in problem areas.

Unlike some communities, Antigo will not be likely to issue a citywide run order, which would allow residents to keep their faucets open a trickle. Tommy Horswill, project manager for Infrastructure Alternates, which operates the city’s water and wastewater plants, said there are several reasons, including unnecessary stress on both the wells and treatment plant.

We don’t want to overtax the plants, Desotell added.

Run orders could be issued, if needed, for specific neighborhoods or individual homes or businesses but plenty of notification will be given first.
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A city crew checked water temperatures and prepared to flush a hydrant at Eighth Avenue and Dorr Street this morning, another chilly day.
2018
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ANTIGO DAILY
JOURNAL
612 Superior Street
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
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612 Superior Street,
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

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