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The late Perk Dinsmore led active life here and around the world
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Friends are remembering Perk Dinsmore, days after the local advocate, environmentalist and woman remembered as the perfect hostess passed away at her home.

Perk, who was 102, and her husband, Lee, carved out a niche locally, statewide, nationally and internationally through their careers and advocacy efforts.

Perk was the person we all strive to be like, Dr. Charles and Jan Wetzel, longtime friends, said. She was intelligent, compassionate, at one with God, passionate for human rights and conservation of the Earth’s bounty. She and Lee worked hard to make our community and the rest of the work better. Knowing her was a true honor and gift.

Perk did not start out as a trendsetter. She was born on Aug. 3, 1914 as Amelia Alice Perkins, daughter of Eli and Sally Perkins, in a log cabin in Saskatchewan, Canada where her parents immigrated from England to homestead.

In her writings, Perk recalled that school was a three-mile walk or mule ride away and memories of the frigid winters remained with her throughout her life.

In 1923, the family returned from church to find their farm on fire, prompting her parents to move with Perk and her two siblings to Chicago and later to Harvey, Ill. where her father resumed his original trade as a bricklayer. Perk worked her way through college, graduating from Northern Illinois Teachers College in 1937, and taught school until her marriage to Lee Dinsmore in 1940.

It was an exciting time. The Dinsmore family traveled to the Middle East, where Lee first served with the International YMCA and later with the U.S. State Department as a foreign service officer.

Assignments took them to Egypt, Iraq, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia, and Italy and they journeyed to other countries in the Near East and Europe. Residence abroad was interspersed with Washington D.C. tours of duty.

Perk became an avid archeology buff, deeply interested in local culture and customs and loved to entertain. Numerous guests included local folks and dignitaries, archeologists, artists, Congressmen and a U.S. Supreme Court justice. Throughout her life, Perk remained in touch with a legion of devoted friends from many countries.

Among her many qualities was that of a perfect hostess, Joe and Peg Jopek said. We enjoyed many dinners and numerous Sunday afternoon teas over the many years of our friendship.

When Lee retired in 1973, the couple returned to the U.S. to make their home in Post Lake near Lee’s parents.

She was a keen supporter of the Post Lake Improvement Association, a member of education, historical, environmental, and political groups and remained a passionate supporter of national and international social justice and peace efforts.

Her commitment to nonviolence, human rights, and equality was a model to her children, grandchildren and others, who have expressed eloquent appreciation of her in a flood of letters.

She was still writing letters to her congressmen and state legislators into her 90s, the Jopeks said. Perk always showed interest in opinions and concerns of others. She could win you over with her charming smile and sense of humor, giving support and comfort when needed.

Always an activist, Perk became involved in school and health issues and was instrumental in establishing Elcho’s Aspirus Health Clinic. She served as secretary/treasurer of Elcho Area Health Planning from 1983 to 2009 and was instrumental in Body Recall, an exercise program for the elderly, coming to the Elcho area.

She was also involved in the Elcho Homemakers Club in the 1970s and 1980.

She enjoyed the arts and she and Lee regularly attended the Elcho High School plays over the years, the Wetzels recalled.

She was the oldest member of the Ice Age Trail Alliance, which she joined in 1990, and was involved in the Langlade County Ice Age Trail Chapter since 1986.

Her enthusiasm and interest in the local community and the world around her were contagious, Joe Hermolin said. She and Lee enriched the lives of all they came in contact with.

In addition to Lee, Perk is survived by daughters Janet (FT Clark) and Sally Dinsmore, grandchildren Scott Alwin (Yvette Shields), Sam Lohr (Debby Lohr), Lee Lohr, Sarah Shoenfeld (Steve Longenecker), Kirsten Lohr (Jeff Hillick), Nicholas Charlesworth, and great-grandchildren Ruthie and Ammon Longenecker, Celia and Ian Lohr, Wesley Alwin, Kaelyn and Grant Hillick, and nieces Nancy Carter and Wendy Cox.

The family will hold a memorial service at a later date in Elcho. A notice will be posted in the Antigo Journal regarding the time and place. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be sent to The Antigo Community Food Pantry.
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Perk and Lee Dinsmore at their home on Post Lake.

The late Perk Dinsmore led active life here and around the world
space
Friends are remembering Perk Dinsmore, days after the local advocate, environmentalist and woman remembered as the perfect hostess passed away at her home.

Perk, who was 102, and her husband, Lee, carved out a niche locally, statewide, nationally and internationally through their careers and advocacy efforts.

Perk was the person we all strive to be like, Dr. Charles and Jan Wetzel, longtime friends, said. She was intelligent, compassionate, at one with God, passionate for human rights and conservation of the Earth’s bounty. She and Lee worked hard to make our community and the rest of the work better. Knowing her was a true honor and gift.

Perk did not start out as a trendsetter. She was born on Aug. 3, 1914 as Amelia Alice Perkins, daughter of Eli and Sally Perkins, in a log cabin in Saskatchewan, Canada where her parents immigrated from England to homestead.

In her writings, Perk recalled that school was a three-mile walk or mule ride away and memories of the frigid winters remained with her throughout her life.

In 1923, the family returned from church to find their farm on fire, prompting her parents to move with Perk and her two siblings to Chicago and later to Harvey, Ill. where her father resumed his original trade as a bricklayer. Perk worked her way through college, graduating from Northern Illinois Teachers College in 1937, and taught school until her marriage to Lee Dinsmore in 1940.

It was an exciting time. The Dinsmore family traveled to the Middle East, where Lee first served with the International YMCA and later with the U.S. State Department as a foreign service officer.

Assignments took them to Egypt, Iraq, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia, and Italy and they journeyed to other countries in the Near East and Europe. Residence abroad was interspersed with Washington D.C. tours of duty.

Perk became an avid archeology buff, deeply interested in local culture and customs and loved to entertain. Numerous guests included local folks and dignitaries, archeologists, artists, Congressmen and a U.S. Supreme Court justice. Throughout her life, Perk remained in touch with a legion of devoted friends from many countries.

Among her many qualities was that of a perfect hostess, Joe and Peg Jopek said. We enjoyed many dinners and numerous Sunday afternoon teas over the many years of our friendship.

When Lee retired in 1973, the couple returned to the U.S. to make their home in Post Lake near Lee’s parents.

She was a keen supporter of the Post Lake Improvement Association, a member of education, historical, environmental, and political groups and remained a passionate supporter of national and international social justice and peace efforts.

Her commitment to nonviolence, human rights, and equality was a model to her children, grandchildren and others, who have expressed eloquent appreciation of her in a flood of letters.

She was still writing letters to her congressmen and state legislators into her 90s, the Jopeks said. Perk always showed interest in opinions and concerns of others. She could win you over with her charming smile and sense of humor, giving support and comfort when needed.

Always an activist, Perk became involved in school and health issues and was instrumental in establishing Elcho’s Aspirus Health Clinic. She served as secretary/treasurer of Elcho Area Health Planning from 1983 to 2009 and was instrumental in Body Recall, an exercise program for the elderly, coming to the Elcho area.

She was also involved in the Elcho Homemakers Club in the 1970s and 1980.

She enjoyed the arts and she and Lee regularly attended the Elcho High School plays over the years, the Wetzels recalled.

She was the oldest member of the Ice Age Trail Alliance, which she joined in 1990, and was involved in the Langlade County Ice Age Trail Chapter since 1986.

Her enthusiasm and interest in the local community and the world around her were contagious, Joe Hermolin said. She and Lee enriched the lives of all they came in contact with.

In addition to Lee, Perk is survived by daughters Janet (FT Clark) and Sally Dinsmore, grandchildren Scott Alwin (Yvette Shields), Sam Lohr (Debby Lohr), Lee Lohr, Sarah Shoenfeld (Steve Longenecker), Kirsten Lohr (Jeff Hillick), Nicholas Charlesworth, and great-grandchildren Ruthie and Ammon Longenecker, Celia and Ian Lohr, Wesley Alwin, Kaelyn and Grant Hillick, and nieces Nancy Carter and Wendy Cox.

The family will hold a memorial service at a later date in Elcho. A notice will be posted in the Antigo Journal regarding the time and place. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be sent to The Antigo Community Food Pantry.
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Perk and Lee Dinsmore at their home on Post Lake.
2017
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ANTIGO DAILY
JOURNAL
612 Superior Street
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

WEEKLY
JOURNAL
EXPRESS
612 Superior Street,
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

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