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Concrete home takes shape for Habitat
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A summer building project is providing a first home for a young Antigo couple and teaching a new mix of skills to local volunteers.

On Wednesday, concrete will be pumped through forms of rigid insulation to create the walls for Kyle and Amber Crum’s new home, being constructed by Habitat for Humanity at the corner of Berner and Gruber streets on the city’s southeast side.

The project is being funded through Habitat with a $55,000 boost from the Thrivent Builds program. The Crums are providing sweat equity and will pay a no-interest mortgage to recoup the costs.

The home is being constructed by volunteers under the supervision of Don Rudolph of TF Forming Systems Inc. of Green Bay, a manufacturer of insulated concrete forms.

“It’s a concrete wall encased in rigid insulation,” Rudolph said, explaining that the end product is extremely energy efficient, with no air infiltration, exceptionally quiet, and most of all, strong, almost impervious to weather conditions such as high winds and tornadoes.

The ThermoForm construction system, which has been simple for the Habitat volunteers to learn, was chosen for the home because Kyle is in a wheelchair, unable to enter and exit the security of a basement in the event of a tornado, and to provide volunteers with some new skills.

“This was a good fit for Habitat,” Paul Grinde, a Habitat volunteer, said. “Our mission is to provide safe, affordable housing. We can teach the volunteers the skills and give them new opportunities as well.”

The Crums have been on-site at the regular work days, with Amber serving as a go-fer and helping out however possible and Kyle manning a pair of tin snips and cutting pieces for the unique framing system.

“I’m excited to have a place that will meet all my needs,” Kyle said, explaining that the home will also be completely handicapped accessible, providing “freedom all the way around.”

Since getting married in February, 2012, the Crums have been living with Kyle’s parents, Amber said, partly due to an inability to find a handicapped accessible home to rent.

“I’m thrilled that it is going to be so efficient,” she said.

Kyle’s mother, Tammy, added that she will also gain an extra sense of security knowing her son and his wife are safe from storms.

“That’s always been a big issue with me, keeping him safe,” she said. “I’m just thrilled for them.”

Rudolph said that construction costs of a concrete house are about 5 to 7 percent higher than a conventional, stick-built home, but those dollars can be recouped quickly through energy savings since the homes are 25 to 50 percent more efficient.

And with the concrete encased on the rigid insulation, exterior and interior appearances will be the same as a conventional home.

“You’re never going to see the concrete,” Rudolph said. “You’ll never know it’s there until you get your energy bill.”

While this type of construction is new to the area, Rudolph said it is quickly gaining favor across the nation, especially in regions of the Midwest that have been lashed by tornadoes.

“We’re building 18 homes in Joplin, Mo. right now plus several commercial buildings,” he said.

Antigo is one of several cooperative Habitat projects in the works for TF Forming Systems and its partner, Dow Chemical, which is donating the rigid insulation board. ThermoForm is the only system on the market that is able to use the donated Dow insulation board without modification to the system or the donated materials.

Habitat for Humanity of Langlade County is a locally-run affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, a nonprofit, ecumenical Christian housing organization. Habitat for Humanity works in partnership with people in need to build and renovate decent, affordable housing. The houses then are sold to those in need at no profit and with no interest charged.

Volunteers provide most of the labor, and individual and corporate donors provide money and materials to build Habitat houses. Partner families themselves invest hundreds of hours of labor—"sweat equity"—into building their homes and the homes of others. Their mortgage payments go into a revolving fund that is used to build more houses.
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Kyle and Amber Crum take a break from volunteering at their new home being constructed by Habitat for Humanity, using a unique concrete wall system, on Antigo's southeast side.

Concrete home takes shape for Habitat
space
A summer building project is providing a first home for a young Antigo couple and teaching a new mix of skills to local volunteers.

On Wednesday, concrete will be pumped through forms of rigid insulation to create the walls for Kyle and Amber Crum’s new home, being constructed by Habitat for Humanity at the corner of Berner and Gruber streets on the city’s southeast side.

The project is being funded through Habitat with a $55,000 boost from the Thrivent Builds program. The Crums are providing sweat equity and will pay a no-interest mortgage to recoup the costs.

The home is being constructed by volunteers under the supervision of Don Rudolph of TF Forming Systems Inc. of Green Bay, a manufacturer of insulated concrete forms.

“It’s a concrete wall encased in rigid insulation,” Rudolph said, explaining that the end product is extremely energy efficient, with no air infiltration, exceptionally quiet, and most of all, strong, almost impervious to weather conditions such as high winds and tornadoes.

The ThermoForm construction system, which has been simple for the Habitat volunteers to learn, was chosen for the home because Kyle is in a wheelchair, unable to enter and exit the security of a basement in the event of a tornado, and to provide volunteers with some new skills.

“This was a good fit for Habitat,” Paul Grinde, a Habitat volunteer, said. “Our mission is to provide safe, affordable housing. We can teach the volunteers the skills and give them new opportunities as well.”

The Crums have been on-site at the regular work days, with Amber serving as a go-fer and helping out however possible and Kyle manning a pair of tin snips and cutting pieces for the unique framing system.

“I’m excited to have a place that will meet all my needs,” Kyle said, explaining that the home will also be completely handicapped accessible, providing “freedom all the way around.”

Since getting married in February, 2012, the Crums have been living with Kyle’s parents, Amber said, partly due to an inability to find a handicapped accessible home to rent.

“I’m thrilled that it is going to be so efficient,” she said.

Kyle’s mother, Tammy, added that she will also gain an extra sense of security knowing her son and his wife are safe from storms.

“That’s always been a big issue with me, keeping him safe,” she said. “I’m just thrilled for them.”

Rudolph said that construction costs of a concrete house are about 5 to 7 percent higher than a conventional, stick-built home, but those dollars can be recouped quickly through energy savings since the homes are 25 to 50 percent more efficient.

And with the concrete encased on the rigid insulation, exterior and interior appearances will be the same as a conventional home.

“You’re never going to see the concrete,” Rudolph said. “You’ll never know it’s there until you get your energy bill.”

While this type of construction is new to the area, Rudolph said it is quickly gaining favor across the nation, especially in regions of the Midwest that have been lashed by tornadoes.

“We’re building 18 homes in Joplin, Mo. right now plus several commercial buildings,” he said.

Antigo is one of several cooperative Habitat projects in the works for TF Forming Systems and its partner, Dow Chemical, which is donating the rigid insulation board. ThermoForm is the only system on the market that is able to use the donated Dow insulation board without modification to the system or the donated materials.

Habitat for Humanity of Langlade County is a locally-run affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, a nonprofit, ecumenical Christian housing organization. Habitat for Humanity works in partnership with people in need to build and renovate decent, affordable housing. The houses then are sold to those in need at no profit and with no interest charged.

Volunteers provide most of the labor, and individual and corporate donors provide money and materials to build Habitat houses. Partner families themselves invest hundreds of hours of labor—"sweat equity"—into building their homes and the homes of others. Their mortgage payments go into a revolving fund that is used to build more houses.
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Kyle and Amber Crum take a break from volunteering at their new home being constructed by Habitat for Humanity, using a unique concrete wall system, on Antigo's southeast side.
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ANTIGO DAILY
JOURNAL
612 Superior Street
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

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JOURNAL
EXPRESS
612 Superior Street,
Antigo, WI 54409
Phone: 715-623-4191
Fax: 715-623-4193
Mail to: Fred Berner
MapOnUs Location: (local)

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